Art Advisors In The New Economy

Art Advisors In The New Economy

pfpf-2015-600x900-1THE ADVANTAGES OF WORKING WITH AN ART ADVISOR

I am frequently asked by my Appraisal clients to help them sell their artwork and I work regularly with other dealers and auction houses to help facilitate this process.  I also assist my clients with the purchase of individual pieces or entire collections of art, working closely with Art Galleries, private dealers and artist studios, and technically, this means I also work as an Art Advisor.

Recently, there was a very interesting article in the New York Times about the increase in Art Advisors working with Galleries and High Net Worth Collectors to help navigate and negotiate within the increasingly complex international art market.  http://nyti.ms/1PsJy3a

Collectors and Artists are often confused about the role of Art Advisors and how to work with them, and at this point, there is no governing body regulating ethics or fee schedules for Art Advisors.  The art market is notoriously secretive about prices and availability of works, creating a sense of urgency to be the one to collect this important artist, or at least be on the “list” to have first rights of purchase on a new work of art.  Art Advisors can provide that access, as well as help to negotiate the prices/commissions on works.  As Art Advisors, we are the bridge between the collector and the gallery, and that is an important distinction in this highly competitive and selective, private world of the Art Market.  Art Advisors are not Gallerists or private dealers and they represent the needs and interests of the art collector and not the artist.

When you purchase a car, you can do the research and determine the Fair Market Value of the car very easily, often even seeing how much the dealer paid for the car in order to help negotiate the price.  The same holds true for the housing market.  The Art Market is still a very insider oriented market, which favors the ones with the right connections.  Art Advisors provide that vital connection.  They are the bridge between the buyers and the sellers  with the knowledge, experience and subtle confidentiality to make important transactions happen in a discreet, efficient and validated way to ensure the very important aspect of Provenance to the art collecting experience.

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com

Another Auction record was recently set with the much anticipated sale of Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” which sold for a record $119,000,000.  The record price was a result of a number of factors, including rarity of the work, and the iconic nature of the image as well as this being such a well recognized, well studied and much reproduced image of a work of art.  To see more about this story, click on the link for the story by CNN.

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com.

 

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst

 

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst.

This will come as no surprise to many people involved in the high end art market.  Fine Art has been an appreciable asset for a long time, even during economic crisis, war, and civil unrest.  Art has more than just intrinsic value, and as appraisers, we know this very well.  It is no surprise to that the art market beat out the stock market last year as an investment category.  Unlike the stock market, there is a very tangible limited supply, and great art will always be in demand.

Helen Frankenthaler, American Legend (1928 – 2011)

Helen Frankenthaler, American Legend (1928 – 2011)

QUOTE:

I wonder if my pictures are more “lyrical” [that loaded word!] because I’m a woman. Looking at my paintings as if they were painted by a woman is superficial, a side issue, like looking at Klines and saying they are bohemian. The making of serious painting is difficult and complicated for all serious painters. One must be oneself, whatever.
* Helen Frankenthaler, source of her woman artist quotes on modern art & paintings: ‘Interview with Helen Frankenthaler’, Henry Geldzahler; ’Artforum’ 4. no. 2, October 1965, p. 39

Helen Frankenthaler died yesterday at the age of 83, and the art world is taking notice of her contribution to the history of art.  She was a legend in her own time and an inspiration to thousands of young artists including myself. She began painting and seriously studying art as a young teenager and worked up until the very end of her life. The legacy that she left behind was more than just about her art; she influenced thousands of young women artists during that time when women were not as prominent as their male contemporaries in the world of art. She has been a favorite artist of mine as long as I can remember, and her techniques of staining the paint directly onto the canvas, along with her lyrical painterly style, will be remembered as one of the major innovations in modern art history and color field painting. Helen Frankenthaler has been quoted as saying, “I do not judge a painting as being good, I ask myself did I create something of beauty?”

Critics, collectors, and curators will undoubtedly agree that she created something of beauty. For that reason alone, she left the world better than she found it. Namaste, Ms. Frankenthaler.

American Art Award Winners

American Art Award Winners

Congratulations to the many amazing artists who recently won different categories in the American Art Awards contest.  This contest is juried by 25 Art Gallery owners from around the United States.  It even includes a very timely category of Teen Bullying for teenage artists.  Some of these artists will amaze you.  My favorite is the second place winner in the Human Figure/Acrylic Category  “MARKET AND POWELL, SAN FRANCISCO” 24 X 48″ Acrylic on canvas by Dan Simoneau, featured above.  Maybe it is part nostalgia for me, having lived in San Francisco for 5 years and still one of my favorite cities.

See some of the other winners at the American Art Awards website