New Layered Encaustic Works by Amy Royce

New Layered Encaustic Works by Amy Royce

Contemporary abstract painter Amy Royce is an artist embracing the ancient art of encaustic painting as well as new mediums, while continually striving for new ways to express herself with her art. Her work is luminous and colorful using layers upon layers of fused wax to create abstract portraits of the physical form and patterns of movement. “My art is a study of self identity using my language to explore universal ideas of communication, awareness and the emotional filtering which influences our perceptions of every interaction” says the artist.

The encaustic medium is an ancient art form from Greco Roman Egypt (circa 100 BC to A.D. 200). Some of these original works have been discovered intact many centuries later and artists are again rediscovering different ways of using beeswax and damar resins in contemporary ways.

Her work is very much influenced by the human figure, and she loves observing and drawing people, wondering what stories are beneath the surface of someone’s expressions and gestures that they develop throughout their lives.  Her latest series is involved with distilling movements that are rooted in the shapes of the structures and movements to electrical impulses and cell patterns, but the viewer can take in the abstract shapes and colors and interpret them for themselves.

Amy felt compelled to pursue art as a career because it never felt like a choice, and derives deep satisfaction from it. Taking risks and relinquishing control through her art and going deep into her personal expression is a highly personal part of her process, describing her works as self-portraits. Like most artists, Amy finds the marketing and business aspect of being an artist sometimes challenging, but she remains very active within her local arts community and stays current with what is happening in the larger art world.  She was recently awarded a scholarship to the prestigious Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Colorado.

Always experimenting with different art mediums and forms, Amy is drawn to three-dimensional form and would like to pursue sculpture as part of her art.  Travel and dancing / movement have both been very influential in her work as an artist, and is evident within her work. When asked what other career she could see herself doing, she replied “I love the life sciences, so I could see myself doing fieldwork in ecology or biology of some kind. I think the balance between left and right brain activities is important and I crave that balance. That’s why I choose typically more technically challenging mediums and find myself drawn to anatomy and movement. If I had musical talent I think it would be fantastic to be a singer or musician.”

Her advice to art students in college now would be to ask for more help from mentors and teachers who understand you and your art direction, and not to waste time with people who tell you that a career in art is fruitless. She says not to be afraid to take risks but arm yourself with as much knowledge as possible, and keep focused on your art and talk to many people about the realities of what it takes to get your art on the market so you can support yourself.

To see more work by Amy Royce:

www.amyroyce.com
Represented by Ozone Fine Art, Newport, OR

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com

Another Auction record was recently set with the much anticipated sale of Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” which sold for a record $119,000,000.  The record price was a result of a number of factors, including rarity of the work, and the iconic nature of the image as well as this being such a well recognized, well studied and much reproduced image of a work of art.  To see more about this story, click on the link for the story by CNN.

The Scream sold for nearly $120 million – CNN.com.

 

Who Are You? Why Artists Need To Know Who They Are

Who Are You? Why Artists Need To Know Who They Are

For artists not wanting to be pigeonholed as one genre or another, this question can seem intrusive and annoying. “Why should I have to limit myself to any one way, why can’t I be constantly evolving?”  This may seem like a valid response, but for an artist that wants to become a professional artist, it is a question you must ask yourself and answer honestly.

Who are you can be as simple as where do you live, or how old are you? It can also be as complicated and detailed as, “I’m a classically trained photorealist painter who now works with found objects, clay, and a pottery wheel to create abstract constructions based on our consumer culture.” As human beings, we are constantly evolving and I would hate to see anyone who stayed the same at 50 as they were when they were 20 years old. We need to grow and evolve, especially for creative individuals, but who you are and what your story says about you is vitally important to why people relate to your art and want to own parts of it. As an art consultant and former gallery owner myself, I found that clients and collectors were most interested in the artist’s story, who they are or were. Once you tell their story, the client feels they know you in some way and can relate to you, and possibly can be a part of your creativity.

When artists begin to write their artist statement or biographical portrait, they must know who they are, and what it is they want to share with the world. You may not be comfortable sharing everything about who you are and why you are the way you are, but it is important to know what influences you and the factors that helped shape who you are as an artist. What influences you? This does not mean listing other artists you like and try to be like, nor does it mean what art movements have been interesting enough for you to follow. When asked the question “what are your influences” an artist must be prepared to share a bit of themselves that does not have to do with copying anybody or anything else. It has to do with who you are as a person and as a creative being, and why you would continue to work so hard at something that very few ever succeed in.

Art history honors the 1st and the most original within all new movements, it does not recognize the ones who thought that movement was interesting and followed along. I tell my kids frequently, “be a leader, not a follower.”  Artists should honor that which is unique to them; be a first-rate version of your own self instead of a copy of someone else.  A museum would never give a solo show to an artist who touted themselves as “influenced by Mark Rothko.”  We all love Mark Rothko, but that is just not interesting to be purposely just like another more famous artist.  What is more interesting would be that your work was influenced by living on a farm in rural Iowa and doing crop rotations every spring, creating mathematical grid patterns within a flat surface, and that the colors you use remind you of the rotting corn in August. That is unique to only you.

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst

 

Art Market Beats Stock Market Once Again – ArtLyst.

This will come as no surprise to many people involved in the high end art market.  Fine Art has been an appreciable asset for a long time, even during economic crisis, war, and civil unrest.  Art has more than just intrinsic value, and as appraisers, we know this very well.  It is no surprise to that the art market beat out the stock market last year as an investment category.  Unlike the stock market, there is a very tangible limited supply, and great art will always be in demand.

Helen Frankenthaler, American Legend (1928 – 2011)

Helen Frankenthaler, American Legend (1928 – 2011)

QUOTE:

I wonder if my pictures are more “lyrical” [that loaded word!] because I’m a woman. Looking at my paintings as if they were painted by a woman is superficial, a side issue, like looking at Klines and saying they are bohemian. The making of serious painting is difficult and complicated for all serious painters. One must be oneself, whatever.
* Helen Frankenthaler, source of her woman artist quotes on modern art & paintings: ‘Interview with Helen Frankenthaler’, Henry Geldzahler; ’Artforum’ 4. no. 2, October 1965, p. 39

Helen Frankenthaler died yesterday at the age of 83, and the art world is taking notice of her contribution to the history of art.  She was a legend in her own time and an inspiration to thousands of young artists including myself. She began painting and seriously studying art as a young teenager and worked up until the very end of her life. The legacy that she left behind was more than just about her art; she influenced thousands of young women artists during that time when women were not as prominent as their male contemporaries in the world of art. She has been a favorite artist of mine as long as I can remember, and her techniques of staining the paint directly onto the canvas, along with her lyrical painterly style, will be remembered as one of the major innovations in modern art history and color field painting. Helen Frankenthaler has been quoted as saying, “I do not judge a painting as being good, I ask myself did I create something of beauty?”

Critics, collectors, and curators will undoubtedly agree that she created something of beauty. For that reason alone, she left the world better than she found it. Namaste, Ms. Frankenthaler.